The American Dissident: Literature, Democracy & Dissidence


SPEECH CRIME PUNISHED IN BARNSTABLE, MASSACHUSETTS

Director Lucy Loomis of Sturgis Library permanently banned the editor without warning or due process on June 19, 2012 for written criticism of her hypocritical policy that "libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view.” The banning clearly proves the point! The ACLUM, PEN New England, Office of Intellectual Freedom (American Library Association), Barnstable Human Rights Commission, and other freedom groups contacted refuse to help the editor obtain justice. The local political hacks, poets, artists, and other librarians don't give a damn. The Barnstable Patriot and Cape Cod Times refuse to even cover the story. Russell Streur, however, pursued the matter (see Camel Saloon) and obtained a minor success for democracy. According to the documents obtained, Loomis' rationale was that I was a danger to "staff and public." Yet I never make threats and have no criminal record.

Check out The American Dissident blog for recent affronts to the estab-lished order (i.e., numerous P. Maudit socio-political cartoons et al).

The American Dissident, a biannual 501 c3 nonprofit publication founded in 1998, seeks risky, "rude truth" submissions, preferably stemming from the questioning and challenging of power, preferably local.

Updated 08/08/15. Issue #29 distributed (see rt column below for cover).

 


Focus

The American Dissident seeks to publish truth—left or right—and especially opposes political correctness and its facile knee-jerk dismissal of any valid criticism as racist, islamophobic, sexist, homophobic, right-wing extremist, conspiracy theory, etc. Read more...

 

Démocratie en péril... au Québec

Cette partie du site contient, entre autres, les notes critiques du rédac'chef sur le Festival International de la Poésie de Trois-Rivières. Lire encore...

 

Photo Exhibit by the Editor

Newfoundland and Labrador on Camel Saloon.

 

Essays and Cartoons by the Editor

See Global Free Press and GFP.

 

New Chapbooks by the Editor (2014)

Transcendental Trinkets is a compilation of essays, poems, broadsides, cartoons, and journal notes all pertinent to Thoreau, Walden Pond, and Concord, where I lived for over a decade and where I was incarcerated for a day. 89 jam-packed pages. Send $9 for a copy.

Transcendental Trinkets

 

Leaves of Democracy/Poems of Heresy was just published by the editor (68 pp, jam-packed) and includes poems, dictums, and an essay challenging Whitman's 1855 "Preface." Send $9. For a sample, LDPH.

Poems of Heresy

 

Triumvirate of the Monkeys includes more critical poems and dictums by the editor and is 72 pp long... jam-packed. Send $9 for a copy.

Triumvirate of the Monkeys

 

Recent AD Blog Posts

Check out the blogs on Anita Walker (MCC), Gibor Basri (UCal), John Sexton (NYU), Keli Goff, Joan Houlihan (Concord Poetry Center), Hanna Pylvanien, Mark Gonzales, Becky Tuch, Lucy Loomis, Jon E. Travis, Mary Jo Bang, Betsy Newell, Stephen Burt, etc. Read about these characters here...

 

Unusually Critical Essays

The essays in this section help illustrate the raison d'être of The American Dissident. Each was written by a known author (e.g., Orwell, Emerson, Camus, Thoreau, Goytisolo, and Solzhenitsyn). The editor culled them from extensive readings over the decades. Such essays are rare. Read more...

 

Unusually Critical Poems

The poems in this section help illustrate like the essays above the raison d'être of The American Dissident. Each was written by a known author (Villon, Byron, Jeffers, Saro-Wiwa, Bukowski, Mandelstam, etc.). The editor culled them from extensive readings over the decades. Poems of a critical nature are very rare. The idea of a critical poem almost seems taboo. Read more...

 

Sixties Sellouts

During the Sixties, we'd call those who subverted their principles for money and power SELLOUTS. Unfortunately, the term became conveniently outmoded as the sellout phenomenon generalized over the years. Read more...

 

 


Why Poetry Doesn't Matter

Harvard’s Stephen Burt and an army of similar academic literary clones control poetry, act as offical Soviet-like gatekeepers of poetry, censor what they do not like, ban those who criticize them, assure the high-brow bourgeois innocuity of poetry, and thus constitute the main reason why poetry does not matter. Burt is depicted in the cartoon below. For a larger version, "hit" the cartoon. Scroll down to check out other parts of why poetry doesn't matter, including the Academy of American Poets, which permanently banned me from commenting on its website.

Stephen Burt

 

Notes on Risk and Rude Truth

Few poets and writers dare risk anything at all—not career, not publication or invitation opportunities, and not collegial connections. Few dare speak the rude truth because most are driven by hopes of "success," fame, and writer's immortality. Read more...

 

Links

Examine links to sites purportedly devoted to Freedom of Speech. Check 'em out...

 

Testing the Waters of Democracy

Censorship and general disdain for vigorous debate seem to be increasing deplorably in America today.  Dismissing criticism and critics with denigrating epithet has become common practice. Rare is the person who will examine the facts and logic presented. Read more...

 

The following organizations, alas, only represent a sample, as personally tested by the editor. Each proved either indifferent or outright hostile towards the editor's exercise of Freedom of Expression. Because of that exercise, the editor was permanently banned from Sturgis Library, spent a day in a Concord Jail cell, was trespassed for six months by Watertown Free Public Library, and lost jobs and job possibilities.

American Library Association

Academy of American Poets

ACLU Massachusetts

Adjunct Advocate

Alehouse Press

Alternate Press Review

American Association of University Professors

Barnstable County Human Rights Commission

Barnstable Town Council

Bennett College

Boston Poetry Union

Briar Cliff Review

Chronicle of Higher Education

City Lights Book Store

Clams Library System of Cape Cod

Comic Book Legal Defense Fund

Concord Cultural Council

Concord Festival of Authors

Concord Poetry Center

Concord Journal

Contemporary Poetry Review

Cultural Center of Cape Cod

Davenport University

Divide

Elmira College

Festival International de la Poésie de Trois-Rivières

Fitchburg State University

Foetry

Georgia Review

Grambling State University

Inside Higher Ed

Mashpee Public Library

Massachusetts Cultural Council

Massachusetts Poetry Festival

Mid-Cape Cultural Council

National Endowment for the Arts

New England First Amendment Center

New Pages

New York Quarterly

Pen New England

Poetry Foundation

Poets House

Poetry Society of America

Poets & Writers

Pulitzer Prize

Pushcart Prize

Robert Creeley Award

Stone Soup Poets

Sturgis Library

Suffolk University Poetry Center

Tufts University Experimental College

University of Massachusetts

Walden Pond State Reservation

Watertown Free Public Library

Writers-at-Large

 

Democracy in Peril—PC Ideology

Unsurprisingly, The American Dissident has been dismissed as sexist and racist by PC ideologues.   Read more...


Democracy in Peril—Islamization

In the New York Times, Washington Post, Time magazine, and other PC publications, the increasing foothold of Islam (Sharia law) in Europe, Canada, and even America is rarely if ever reported. Read more...

Jess Klein

 

 

 

 

 


 


Student Comments

One of the most positive things regarding The American Dissident has been Professor Dan Sklar's invitations over the past six years. Sklar is a rare, rare, very rare, rare bird in the academic nest. Read more...

 

Contributors to The AD

Without the generous support of contributors, The American Dissident would not be alive and kicking today. Examine some of the essays, poems, and reviews published in The American Dissident. Read more...

 

Issue #29 Front Cover

The American Dissident

 

Issue #26 Banned

Now, what in the last issue of The American Dissident would have made library director Kathleen Mahoney wish the issue to be censored and banned from the library system? Mahoney had agreed to subscribe, had me fill out a tax form, and send her a copy of the journal. Read more...

The American Dissident

 

Issue #22 Banned

In fact, issue #22 was presented to Lucy Loomis, director of Sturgis Library, as a free subscription offer. She rejected the offer. Months later she permanently banned me from Sturgis w/o due process for a speech crime (an open letter disseminated to the library directors of the Clams Library System of Cape Cod). See Sturgis Library on the list to the left for details.

Lucy Loomis

 

Caustic Cartoons by P. Maudit

P. Maudit cartoons are featured on The American Dissident blog and elsewhere on this website. Read more...

 

Reviews of The American Dissident

The editor has had to pound on doors to get The American Dissident reviewed. Library Journal and American Libraries Magazine (American Library Association) both, for example, simply refuse to review it. Read more...

 

The Editor Interviewed

The editor has had to pound on doors to get interviewed. Read more...

 

The Editor Criticized

Established-order proponents and apparatchiks, as well as most others, when criticized by the editor have dismissed The American Dissident almost always with ad hominem. Read more...

 

Literary Letters from Issue #29 & #23

Each issue of The American Dissident contains an ample selection of letters questioning and challenging free-speech scorning academics, literati, editors, cultural council apparatchiks, librarians, etc. Read more...

 

Parrhesiastic Writing

"The Cold Passion for Truth Hunts in No Pack" is a lengthy essay written by the editor on democracy and literature and the case for parrhesiastic poetry, writing, and art. Read more...

 

Caustically Critical Reviews

The editor is not an aficionado of backslapping and self-congratulating, pervasive, to say the least, in the literary milieu, both high and low brow.  Only a fool, "brilliant" or whatever, would run out to buy a book or literary journal because someone "brilliant" or whatever endorsed it with the usual suspect vocabulary "brilliant," "cutting edge," "great," "original" "one of the world's most significant," "one of the best," "stunningly beautiful," "innovative," etc., etc. Read more...